History

 

On 15th July 1887, Fr. John Boylan PP purchased a two-acre site from his brother Charles for £30. The architect for the new church was William Hague. The contractor was James McAdorey, Dundalk. The total cost was £5,691. The cut-stone was drawn by cart from Ross quarry near Mountnugent. The majority of the money was collected by Fr. Boylan in the USA. The new church was dedicated on 25th November 1888 by Bishop Edward McGinnis. During its long history, the interior of the church was embellished by Fr. Thomas McCauley and Mgr. Patrick Gaffney. The sanctuary area was restored in 2000 as a Jubilee year project.

stained glass window erected by Rev. Hugh BradyThe church contains some beautiful stained glass windows, the main ones dating from 1909. Some were erected by the Very Rev P. Lynch, and others by Very Rev Hugh Brady. They can be seen in this gallery.

Matthew O’Byrne, Fountain Head Bell

Foundry James’s Street, Dublin

This bell was presented to St Mary’s Church Crosserlough by Miss Bridget McEvoy of Leehary in memory of her brother Peter McEvoy of Utica, USA, in 1914

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Matthew O’Byrne of The Fountain Head Bell Foundry was one of the best known of the Dublin bell founders.His father, Matthew Byrne (Matthew junior added the O’) had been a Chief Engineer in The Royal Navy before he established an iron foundry in James’s Street, Dublin, in 1840.

Bells by Matthew O’Byrne were cast and, where necessary, tuned in the foundry before being fitted with headstocks and other fittings. From here, they were sent to Roman Catholic and Church of Ireland customers all across Ireland, some of Matthew O’Byrne’s bells were bought by churches in Liverpool and Leeds, New South Wales in Australia and Newfoundland in Canada.

In 1887 the “M Byrne Patent Rotary Mounting” was patented. This was a cast-iron headstock with a tapered hole through which a tapered boss on the crown of the bell was inserted and bolted in place using the crown staple bolt:
“we claim that [this] is the best in existence; in fact, it has no rivals….By slacking the nuts, the bell can be rotated…in a few moments, thus presenting a new striking face to the tongue to strike. This increases the life of the Bell beyond measure”.

Prior to the advent of this rotary mounting, the spots on the interior of bells where they were struck would, over time, erode, thus changing the tuning and reducing the lifespan of the bell.

The Inscription on the bell reads:

MATTHEW O’BYRNE FOUNTAIN HEAD BELL FOUNDRY. ST JAMES’S STREET DUBLIN.
THIS BELL WAS PRESENTED TO ST MARY’S CHURCH CROSSERLOUGH.
BY MISS BRIDGET MC EVOY OF LEEHARY. IN MEMORY OF HER BROTHER.
PETER MC EVOY OF UTICA U.S.A. 1914.
MOST REV PATRICK FINEGAN. BISHOP OF KILMORE
VERY REV HUGH BRADY. P.P.V.F. CROSSERLOUGH

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